Taciturn


Some might call it procrastination; others think it’s neglect; perhaps it might be avoidance. I’ve been guilty of all three at times.

Today, I’m choosing to call my seven-month absence from posting on my blog as taciturn. Bartlett’s Roget’s Thesaurus covers my silence quite thoroughly. I refuse to comment on the weather, politics, or religion. My husband would dispute that assertion, but that’s my story and I’m sticking to it. Actually, I’ve been busy doing what writers do. Writing!

After finishing the third book in The Dahlonega Sisters series, https://www.amazon.com/author/dianemhow

I decided to brush the dust off my very first (still unpublished) romantic suspense novel, Burning Embers. It was written during NaNoWriMo. If you aren’t familiar with this supportive writing organization, I encourage you to check it out. https://nanowrimo.org. I’m probably on my tenth round of edits, but I keep plugging away it and hope to see it published by fall of 2022.

Besides weaving stories, I weave baskets. Here are a few I’m getting ready to sell along with my books at a pop-up market at Third Wheel Brewery https://www.thirdwheelbrewing.com/ on May 7. A dozen vendors will display their handmade crafts just in time for Mother’s day. Come check it out and grab a bite to eat while sampling a cold brew. Win, win!

Last but not least, in honor of Mother’s Day, I’m sharing a picture of my Mom and sisters.

I miss her every day and I thank her for teaching me to be responsibe, generous, and unselfish. I will never be as good at it as she was, but I try.

I’m giving away a basket and book package. (sorry, USA only). All you need to do is comment on this post with a note about your mother or a mother figure who influenced your life. I’ll draw a name on May 8th and contact the winner for details.

Can’t wait to hear your stories.

More Than Just Writing


I’m trying to juggle writing the second book in a series, editing a romantic suspense, drafting a short story and poem for upcoming contests, and marketing my first novel. It’s overwhelming.

Sometimes, I have to step away and play for a little bit. What do I do when I’m not stuck in front of my laptop pecking away at the keyboard?

I weave baskets. Yes, old fashion basketry. Did you know some of the oldest baskets date back 10,000 to 12,000 years? Believe it or not, I’m not the only one interested in this craft. In fact, there are hundreds, probably thousands, of men and women who belong to guilds all over the United States.

Every August, my daughter and I attend the Missouri Basketweavers Guild (see basketweavers.org) convention, spending the weekend creating amazing baskets and sharing time with other weavers. In order to keep our skills fresh, and just because we love doing it, we gather in my home with another dear friend about once a month and create something new.

I finished my first basket of the year this weekend. It’s called Lucky. The pattern was designed by Dianne Gleixner, a gifted instructor I met at one of the conventions I attended.

Basket weaving is my guilty pleasure, right after wine and dark chocolate. It uses another part of my brain that needs attention too. There’s something therapeutic about working the reed, packing the rows snug, and shaping it until it looks like the one in the picture.

Just for a little while, my mind isn’t consumed by plots and dialogues, inciting incidents and Amazon ads, Facebook posts and Book This or Book That. In order to achieve success in the craft, I have to focus on the pattern and use my hands and fingers in a different way. It frees my mind from writing, just for a short while.

What is it that you do when you need a distraction from your work? Do you sew? Read? Solve puzzles?

How about taking a few minutes to share, you never know when you might inspire someone to try something new.